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Get the Facts2


Get the Facts

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Get the Facts2


Get the Facts

New Analysis Group Report Highlights Major Flaws in Northern Pass Transmission Economic Study

Click here to read the full report

Some of the conclusions of the Analysis Group report concerning the LEI study on Northern Pass include the following:

  • While claiming to be a “cost/benefit” analysis, the LEI study examines only the purported benefits of Northern Pass, but not the costs;
  • The public version of the report is atypical in the amount of information that is redacted, severely limiting the public’s ability to objectively analyze its findings;
  • The report’s conclusions are based on several incorrect assumptions; 
  • The study fails to account for significant negative impacts including potential adverse impacts on tourism, New Hampshire’s second-largest industry; potential for lost jobs and property taxes from the closings of other power plants in New Hampshire; and inhibiting construction of other power plants in New Hampshire which would support local jobs and construction dollars;
  • NPT is an expensive line to build. The NPT Line would likely cost $55/MWh (or 5.5 cents per kWh) above and beyond the expected cost of power to New England customers, due to the cost of actually constructing the line. While other studies have assumed that this cost is borne by customers outside of New Hampshire, Analysis Group’s report points out that this outcome is unlikely. In addition, the cost could be even larger due to the need for Hydro-Quebec to construct additional hydro resources that would be priced in as well;

The Northern Pass Project will not serve New Hampshire.

  • Northern Pass is like a monstrous extension cord that crosses New Hampshire to supply electricity to Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Just 10 percent of the energy will come into New Hampshire … and it is energy the state doesn’t even need.
  • This massive project is designed to fix a problem that doesn’t exist. The state already generates more power than it uses, and electricity demand has been trending downward.
  • Big utility companies, including Canada’s Hydro-Québec and Eversource Energy, stand to make billions from this project and New Hampshire consumers will eventually pay the price on their energy bills.
  • Hydro-Québec – a $13 billion company with nearly 20,000 employees in Canada – benefits from exporting power because they can sell electricity to New England consumers for a better price than in Canada.
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Get the Facts3


Clear-cutting and construction through the North Country to Concord, through forests and towns, and the massive towers and high voltage lines will be an eyesore and a blight on the environment … and burying the lines will not eliminate the destruction.

  • Major environmental and conservation organizations in the state are opposed to the project.
  • The destruction to our magnificent landscape will not be salvageable. New Hampshire’s beautiful forests, including the White Mountain Forest, are world famous, and it will take hundreds of years to replace the trees and landscape that will be destroyed.
  • The bulldozers, trucks, helicopters delivering the pylons, and other machinery used during the construction will plague communities with noise and inconvenience, and drive away visitors.
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Get the facts 4


Claims of new jobs and economic gains by Northern Pass proponents are vastly overblown and the jobs they promise are temporary.

  • The jobs created by the Northern Pass Project will be temporary construction jobs – unlikely to last more than two years.
  • The project will be built ‘on spec’ – the developers hope that if they are allowed to build it they can compete with local power producers to sell imported electricity.
  • The negative economic consequences to communities that depend on tourism is significant, as roads will be torn up and scenery and communities disrupted for years.
  • Chambers of Commerce representing communities along the line have opposed the project because of its negative economic impact, including harming local tourism, real estate and local energy economies.
  • Until recently that included the North Country Chamber of Commerce, which just “softened” it’s opposition amid accusations of financial pressure from Eversource.  Two chamber members resigned in protest and a third went public with a detailed account of the process.  (“Chamber ends longtime opposition to Northern Pass,” Union Leader, April 11, 2016)
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The Northern Pass Project is not clean and green as advertised.

  • Over-reliance on new transmission lines which bring excess (and unnecessary) power into New Hampshire will take the focus away from energy efficiency and development of renewable energy, and will hinder progress on reducing greenhouse gases.
  • Hydroelectric power – like that generated by Canada’s Hydro-Québec’s huge dams – is not carbon-free. Not only do dams disrupt rivers and their habitat, but “… hydropower reservoirs do generate carbon emissions, and some scientists think these emissions could be substantial – maybe enough to cancel out the system’s green benefits.” (“Reservoir emissions: a quiet threat to expanding hydropower,” ClimateWire, December 6, 2013)
  • A Conservation Law Foundation report authored by Synapse Energy Economics released in February 2012 states that, “… large-scale hydropower, especially new reservoirs, is worse for the environment than Northern Pass’s developers are claiming, with substantial greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to those of modern natural gas-fired power plants.”  
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Get the Facts 6


Get the Facts 6


Eversource hasn’t been upfront on a lot of issues, including the project cost and cost to customers.

  • The real costs of the project are “confidential,” which Northern Pass says is standard practice in an “energy market where customers are free to purchase energy from a supplier of their choice …” (The Northern Pass Blog, July 15, 2016)

  • The Concord Monitor reported on September 16, 2016 that New Hampshire’s Office of the Consumer Advocate is fighting Eversource Energy’s request to keep secret the price it plans to pay for power off the Northern Pass transmission line. Donald Kreis, the state’s independent Consumer Advocate said consumers have a right to know, and that “Ratepayers will be responsible for the deal whether it proves beneficial or not.”

  • Eversource continues to claim that the project will cost $1.4 billion, yet Bill Quinlan, Eversource’s president of New Hampshire electric operations said in 2014 (before they decided to bury about 80% of the lines) that, “Burying the lines in a rugged environment like New Hampshire’s mountains would raise the cost to $3 billion or $4 billion from $1.4 billion, an increase that would be passed on to ratepayers in New Hampshire. (“Canadian rivers: Solution to Northeast’s high energy prices?” Associated Press, August 2, 2016)

  • Eversource can’t seem to get a handle on the real cost of the project. The cost of the project has gone up 40% since it was proposed in 2010 due to changes in the energy market … and not including any price increase due to burying the lines.